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The Last Of Us 2 Director Explains The Pearl Jam Plot Hole

The Last of Us Part II writer-director Neil Druckmann has cleared up the apparent plot hole pertaining to the band Peal Jam. But first, some background. Guitars are used as a symbolic tool to show the bond between Joel and Ellie, with several songs popping up in cutscenes. Guitars even appear as playable objects, and it’s possible for experienced musicians to recreate songs on Ellie’s in-game guitar. But one thing has remained unclear–how is Joel able to perform a song in-game that would have never been released in his world because of the outbreak?

In an early cutscene, Joel performs a cover of Pearl Jam’s “Future Days,” which appeared on the album Lightning Bolt. This album released on October 15, 2013–several weeks after September 26, 2013, which is Outbreak Day in the world of The Last of Us Part II. So how did Joel know a song that never got released?

According to director Neil Druckmann, it’s simple–the song was performed live at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois on July 19, and Joel saw a video of it on YouTube.

This makes sense, but it’s a shame that Joel’s canonical backstory on this song doesn’t involve him getting to go to the concert himself. In fact, getting the song in the game was a bit of a difficult task, and Druckmann nearly flew to Seattle to meet with Eddie Vedder.

Joel’s performance of this song can actually be traced back further to a Last of Us performance by voice actors Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson, which included an epilogue to the game in which Joel began teaching Ellie how to play the guitar. This scene ultimately made its way into the sequel.

Unlike the original game, The Last of Us Part II won’t get story DLC, although a multiplayer standalone mode is coming.

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Last Of Us 2 Director Responds To The Internet Hate

Seven years after the release of the original, The Last of Us Part II is finally out now on PlayStation 4. Even before release, writer-director Neil Druckmann acknowledged that some fans of the first game would dislike the sequel, and now that the game is out, he’s responded to more of the internet hate.

Speaking on former Nintendo boss Reggie Fils-Aime’s podcast, Druckmann said it’s worthless to fight against people when they share their opinions about a game–whether it be good or bad. However, Druckmann said he can’t understand how people get so worked up and upset about fictional characters.

“I think you have to create some separation to say, we made this game, we believe in this game, we’re proud of this game, now it’s out there and it’s like whatever reaction people have–whether they like it or not–that’s fair,” Druckmann said. “That’s their reaction and you don’t fight that. The other thing with the more hateful stuff, the more vile stuff, that’s a little harder. It’s especially harder when I see it happening to team members or cast members who play a particular character in the game.”

“We have an actor, she’s been getting really awful, vile stuff because of a fictional character she’s playing in the game,” Druckmann added. “I just have a hard time wrapping my mind around that. The thing I try to do is just ignore it as much as I can. When things escalate to being serious, there are certain security protocols that we take and I report it to the proper authorities. Then you just try to focus on the positives and focus on distracting yourself with other stuff. But it’s kind of just the reality.”

Also in the interview, Druckmann said he’s been speaking with Chernobyl writer Craig Mazin about this topic. They are currently working together on the HBO TV version of The Last of Us.

“I’ve had a lot of conversations with him about this stuff. He articulated it pretty well, it’s like people have to get educated. This is kind of the cost. When you’re doing something big, and you might disappoint fans, there is a cost to it now,” Druckmann said. “Which is, you’re going to get a certain level of hate, a certain level of vitriol that you just have to deal with. There is no other way to make it go away.”

Despite some portion of the audience disliking The Last of Us Part II, the game broke PlayStation’s sales records with 4 million copies sold in its first three days.

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